G8 and the Issues of Refugees

Written by admin in 19 July 01

Ref.: 56 – M – 196

Thursday July 19, 2001

Canada: Prime Minister Jean Chretian

France: President Jacques Chirac

Germany: Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder

Italy: Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi

Japan: Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi

Russia: President Putin

United Kingdom: Prime Minister Tony Blair

United States of America: President George Bush

Immigrants, Asylum Seekers, The Displaced

While thousands of protesters have massed in Genoa for the first in a series of demonstrations against the 27th annual economic summit which begins in the city on Friday the first of these marches is dedicated to issues concerning refugees and immigrants.

Although apart from Russia, the seven richest countries of the world do not have the problem of their people seeking asylum or enforced immigration but as host nations, they face the difficulties of dealing with its related problems.

If we accept that the pain of seeking asylum or enforced immigration is a catastrophic one and the reasons for leaving one’s home is usually unsafe circumstances, the refugees only have the one choice of coming to the countries that in their opinion will provide them with refuge. This in turn threatens the safe social structure of the host countries. So far, a logical solution to this problem has not been reached. This is simply because the real reason behind this misery is hidden in the economic benefits of the richest countries in the world.

  • The economic benefits of the most prosperous countries are in having a suitable market. Their most suitable market lies in the third world and developing countries that export refugees. It seems that the only way of maintaining these suitable markets is in backing the leaders who can best serve this purpose.

  • In discussing the troubled world economy and improvements to global trade, should you not consider the globalization of human rights values? Should you not act more responsibly and set an ethical policy for your trade developments?

You must evaluate the human costs to these oppressed nations and reassess your approach.